A Radical Theory of Consciousness

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Consciousness from a Scientific Perspective

What is consciousness and from whence does it arise and can we as human even write about this without becoming befuddled? We, as humans, have a modicum of consciousness, so to write about consciousness is problematic much the same as defining a word using the word we are defining in its definition.

Most neuroscientists seek to find the arising of consciousness in a brain, mainly the human brain, although others admit consciousness could arise from a bee’s brain amongst many others, for example.

Wikipedia defines consciousness:

Consciousness is the state or quality of awareness, or, of being aware of an external object or something within oneself.[1][2] It has been defined variously in terms of sentience, awareness, subjectivity, the ability to experience or to feelwakefulness, having a sense of selfhood or soul, the fact that there is something “that it is like” to “have” or “be” it, and the executive control system of the mind,[3] or the state or quality of awareness, or, of being aware of an external object or something within oneself.[1][2] In contemporary philosophy its definition is often hinted at via the logical possibility of its absence, the philosophical zombie, which is defined as a being whose behavior and function are identical to one’s own yet there is “no-one in there” experiencing it.

Despite the difficulty in definition, many philosophers believe that there is a broadly shared underlying intuition about what consciousness is.[4] As Max Velmans and Susan Schneider wrote in The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness: “Anything that we are aware of at a given moment forms part of our consciousness, making conscious experience at once the most familiar and most mysterious aspect of our lives.”[5]

Neuroscience is reductionistic in the sense of “looking for” a seat of consciousness. Problems continue to arise with the neuroscientist as observer of consciousness. Or what is outside of consciousness? This subject object relationship becomes increasing difficult and problematic in the reductionistic nature of science.

Most theories of consciousness divide it into levels while neuroscience looks to the “seat” of consciousness. All the theories are generated from reductionistic principles.

Cosmic or transcendental consciousness as in enlightenment is consciousness and may be the least reductionistic. Though explaining Comic Consciousness and the functions of its expression requires some reductionistic thinking / writing.

 

Thoughts about Consciousness as Cosmic and its Meaning

Even to write that consciousness is Cosmic is to reduce the experience of said consciousness into a reductionistic concept based on the technology of written language and that is a problem. And even though the problem can be overcome it cannot be done within this context.

Cosmic Consciousness fits nicely with Buddhist philosophy especially when one considers that human beings or any being with a brain or neurons or complex life is a receptor or expression of consciousness.

Let’s assume:

  • All consciousness is Cosmic and pervades all.
  • Consciousness is. Consciousness is everywhere and permeates every being (elements such as rock, Earth, air and water are beings as well as all animal and plant life are beings and are receptors of Cosmic Consciousness.
  • Consciousness expresses it self through a variety of beings – human beings have a technology to assist in expressing how Cosmic Consciousness manifests in humans.
  • Enlightenment is the actionable part of Consciousness. Buddhist philosophy states that human beings are enlightened and that only illusion stands in our way of this experience.
  • Death is death of the body not the death of consciousness. Consciousness never dies.
  • Reincarnation is the journey / expression of consciousness through a variety of expressions or points of view
  • Cognitive recognition of the view of the Is-ness of consciousness expressed through a series of individuals to a state of transcendental enlightenment represents the expression of one consciousness across many lives.
  • The expression of Cosmic Consciousness in an individual human is limited by the perceptual faculties of said human
  • Illusion is created at conception when consciousness is conscripted into a set of cells and when the child learns language and delineates oneself from the unity of Cosmic Consciousness through the expression of self and the other.
  • Illusion and the creation of identity are necessary in the play of consciousness.
  • Identity allows for an illusion of separateness to exist. This is necessary to allow a human identity to create energy (light) in its journey into Oneness, the Oneness of Consciousness. The journey itself is also an illusion.
  • A human’s urge is a play between separation from Oneness to create identity and definitions of the self and the urge to be One with All That Is. This can be characterized as a struggle.
  • Struggle is the battle between “Yes” and “No”. Struggle can only be effective when a compassionate neutral witness sees the struggle. The neutral part acts as a valve to store the energy created in the struggle. Struggle without the neutral witness stays in the worlds of illusion.
  • The struggle when recognized as raising one’s consciousness can generate much energy in the form of light. This struggle is capable of overcoming illusion while acknowledging illusion as a motivator of spirit’s contact with matter to create energy to constantly surmount the small self or ego by way of the divinity within.
  • Death may be analogous to sleep, a forgetting…
  • When a singular consciousness has journeyed through many lives they are called old souls. These old souls begin to remember former lives in increasing detail.
  • The oldest of souls remember the life (or lives) after the death of the body.

 

Take a rest and come back to the material later.

 

Buddhist, Mayan and Gurdjieffian philosophies are reflected in this piece

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