Memory, Time and Identity

“The distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”  Einstein

ArcOtimeX

Linear time is the kind of time we know and we are often unaware of it and rarely question its veracity due to its invisibility.

Memory is the foundation of identity, time, space, intent, purpose, meaning and perhaps destiny. Without memory humans as we know the species could not exist.

Sense Organs and Memory

Senses

Memory, both long and short term, appears to be stored and processed in the human neo-cortex. It is created through a variety of perceptual filters through a variety of senses that are organ-based for external stimuli:

  1. Visual
  2. Auditory
  3. Tactile
  4. Olfactory
  5. Gustatory (taste)
  6. Itch
  7. Pressure
  8. Temperature
  9. Hunger
  10. Thirst
  11. Pain
  12. Direction
  13. Muscle Tension
  14. Proprioception -the ability to tell where your body parts are, relative to other body parts
  15. Equilibrioception – spatial orientation, balance, body movement, acceleration and decceralation, directional changes
  16. Stretch Receptors – these are found in such places as the lungs, bladder, stomach, blood vessels, and the gastrointestinal tract.)
  17. Chemoreceptors – these triggers areas of the medulla in the brain that is involved in detecting blood born hormones and drugs. It also is involved in the vomiting reflex.
  18. Sexual stimulation

Non-organ sensations cannot be separated from memory and they include but may not be limited to:

  • Attention – may be the only sense involves the shifting or changing focus to internal or external stimuli in present time and involves memory as an adjunct
  • Time / Memory- time* cannot exist without memory and memory cannot exist without time
  • Agency – meaning a subjective feeling of having chosen an action
  • Familiarity – recognition (grounded in long and short term memory cues)

All the sense organs / filters listed above interact with memory and help form a sensation of the passage of time and cement individual and species identity. Memory is processed through and interacts with a number of perceptual filters that we as humans create our environment (see figure 1 below):

personMemory

Senses, Memory and Attention

Individual memories exist and are malleable. Memory is selective depending on how we cultivate focused and diffused attention within conscious memory. Our brains hold more information than the conscious memories that we can recall. That information could consist of our unconscious memories. It is possible to access unconscious memories in the present through a variety of techniques (practiced divided attention, trance-work, hypnotherapy to name a few).

Language, ego, learning, familial prejudices and biases, beliefs and emotional states are some of the factors that are screeners for the focus of attention. The amount of information that impinges on all our sense organs and their combinations are much more than we remember consciously. This unregistered data may represent some of the information that comes through to us in dreams and /or it could be useful in long term memory retrieval and reconstruction and / or it could represented shared memory consciousness, “past, future or parallel lives”. Until we access the unconscious materials we may never know what the specifics of unregistered data, how it is stored, where it is stored and how it can be retrieved.

All of us know how to focus our attention because we have been inculcated with this method of “paying attention” since we entered elementary school. Most American public education systems have been organized along a Prussian military system of rows and columns dictated for order with attention drawn exclusively to the teacher. This way of directing attention besides being an active method is built on a hierarchical system that implies strata or a class system.

Active attention is a subject focusing on an object as directed by a intermediary mainly a teacher. Television, Cinema, and some computer applications are examples of active attention systems. Networks of roads and automobile travel also follows the active attention system.

Receptive attention is invisible mostly because the habituation of active / focused attention. Receptive attention could be relegated to daydreaming and is mostly discarded as a learning strategy. Receptive attention involves subtly shifting focus from one point to an aggregate field. This kind of focus is one of dividing attention by shifting from different foci. For example look at the dot at the center of figure 3.

 

AttentionExercise

Blur your focus. Then use your peripheral vision to attend to the field. This can be done in your house as well: 1. Stare a point on the wall opposite of where you are sitting; 2. While continuing to stare at the dot pay attention to the surround “aggregate” field with your attention taking note of what you glean in your visual field. Exercises like this one are designed to stretch or lengthen attention span while allowing the receptive information that your senses are registering to be acknowledged and cataloged to some degree.

Attention is the building block of consciousness. Memory recall allows attention to expand based on previous experiences. The main danger and/or benefit of operating from memory are assumptions. The danger of some assumptions based on memories of previous experiences could be premises that are faulty for a variety of reasons. The benefit of making assumptions based on memories are streaming lining habits that become part of autonomic processing. Driving a car is an example. Once we learn the processes of driving they become habit and go into autonomic processing flow.

Repetitive acts become habits seamlessly so our conscious minds can pay attention to other stimuli in our immediate environments.

 

Space-Time and Memory

Linear time is the kind of time we know. We know this kind of time so well we don’t call it linear. We don’t see it as illusion or a system we invented unless we have been alerted that it exists in this way. Linear time is invisible and seamless. We continually make assumptions about “the past” as if it is a place that exists – in the past because we remember it. We remember past events that have been ordered by language and linear-spatial time because our parents and the current epoch of civilization have taught us to structure reality in this way. We learned aural language to communicate with our parents and define ourselves – “this is me and this is not me” etc. The structure of language follows a pattern of past, present and future.

Most of our identity is recorded in our memory. The past exists in the present accessible through memories. Assumptions about “the future” are extrapolations based on past assumptions of commonly observable events currently stored in memory.

Families, friends, groups, communities, states, nations and historians holding a particular point of view agree upon shared memories of recorded histories. These consensual memories are sometimes built on entrenched philosophical stances and highly charged emotional states. Conservative Republicans have different interpretations of facts presented by historians than Left leaning Liberal Democrats. Sometimes facts are disputed and sometimes not but the course of action differs based on belief etc.

Memories record the passage of time and provide the illusion that the past exists in a place. The reason for this is memories recreate the passage of time in a full sensory 3-D memory replete with emotional content etc. Past memories are not the literal past. Memories are merely a record of past events.

It’s easier to see that the future doesn’t exist because we have no memory of it. We anticipate future events base on past memories, extrapolations, assumptions and expectations etc.

The fleeting present that disappears into short term memory can barely be grasped if at all. Memory, associative thought and emotion are the factors that help create identity.

 

Collective / Shared Memory

Our human species while having features in our brains and bodies for memory storage there may be a shared weak EM (electromagnetic) field that may hold memories in common. However there is mutual agreement for collective memory as recorded in history books and writings made by individuals in history itself. Individual memories interact with others to form a collective memory system (see figure 2 below):

MemoryNet

 

Memory is both individual and shared. A human cannot thrive alone completely. Infants need parents for care and learning – creating the basis for shared and eventually collective memories. This not only defines individual identity but it also ensures the survival of the species.

Strong recognition appears to be based on emotional bonds that are reinforced by memory recall as well as many accompanying perceptual filters (organs). I recognize my mother’s face and she recognizes mine. There is an emotional bond that sparks memory with the bond of love. This is one example of how we create an individual in an interdependent social world.

In NDE (Near Death Experiences) people sometimes report passing through a tunnel of light and meeting relatives that have passed on. Are these memories of “dead” relatives or are these actual relatives?

When my father passed to the next life I watched different vibrational fields create the tunnel of light that his consciousness passed through. He “met” his dead relatives and conjured them up as he remembered them. They in-turn used these conjurings to interface in a recognizable medium for the purpose of communication. (Could this also be happening as we meet friends and relatives still living?)

Many quantum physicists are admitting that reality is created by us and projected “out there” to be experienced. If we as a species are creating reality based on the 18 senses listed below:

  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Tactile
  • Olfactory
  • Gustatory (taste)
  • Itch
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Hunger
  • Thirst
  • Pain
  • Direction
  • Muscle Tension
  • Proprioception -the ability to tell where your body parts are, relative to other body parts
  • Equilibrioception – spatial orientation, balance, body movement, acceleration and decceralation, directional changes
  • Stretch Receptors – these are found in such places as the lungs, bladder, stomach, blood vessels, and the gastrointestinal tract.)
  • Chemoreceptors – these triggers areas of the medulla in the brain that is involved in detecting blood born hormones and drugs. It also is involved in the vomiting reflex.
  • Sexual stimulation

And 4 non-organ sensations cannot be separated from memory (or 22 senses in all) and they include but may not be limited to:

  • Attention – may be the only sense involves the shifting or changing focus to internal or external stimuli in present time and involves memory as an adjunct
  • Time / Memory – time* cannot exist without memory and memory cannot exist without time
  • Agency – meaning a subjective feeling of having chosen an action
  • Familiarity – recognition (grounded in long and short term memory cues)

 

All 22 senses listed above rely on memory to function. If memory did not exist we would not know about them. Time and Memory are so inexorably bound and belong together as a sense and involve all other senses.

All the senses listed above including time/memory work in concert with others of our human species. It would seem that memory and the “passage of time” that composes the identity of individuals is necessary for the survival of the species. It follows that our species might also interact with other collective memories of species such as mammals, animals, vegetation, bacteria and viruses.

There are two types of time-space-memory modalities one is explicit and the other implicit. The explicit or more obvious time/space/memory modality is oral and written history, archeology – most written and is based on consensual historical agreements of past memories. There are histories of the Holocaust as perpetrated by Hitler and the Nazis is a matter of eye-witness accounts. There are oral histories – both in person and through media as films and television documentaries and written histories in books. However its safe to report that there is no one still alive to give an oral report of the American Revolutionary War. Our collective memories arise from written histories after the fact and documents written during the time of the war. An implicit modality is only a theory that there is a collective time/space collective memory net in a low frequency EM field.

The discovery of magnetite produced in the human brain that assists in generating a low level EM (Electromagnetic) field that coordinates with the electromagnetic energy of Earth and with geomagnetic storms. Since memory is stored as electric impulses in the brain it can be extrapolated that the low EM field could relate to an exo-corporeal field that the members of the human species create in a group memory net.

Memories accessed from the group memory net (GMN) could be a form time travel via consciousness transfer alone. Authors writing similar themes in distant locations could have easily accessed the GMN. The GMN could define the human species as a whole via access and group subsets within that whole that may supersede the connectivity of the Internet.

 

NOTES:

*Time – time may be experienced in a wider consciousness and lose memory as we know it. This is nearly impossible to explain because it supersedes ordinary human experience

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/coming-to-grips-with-the-implications-of-quantum-mechanics/

 

https://www.gaia.com/video/brain-crystals-and-psychic-powers?fullplayer=feature

 

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