An O Social Commentary Dictionary Two Point O

yellow tassel

I thought of calling this dictionary the FKO Social Commentary Dictionary – after my initials, but would that give a flippant and a wrong message. You get the idea.

So, I thought “O”

As in Oh or “O”MG.

“O” is the first and last letter of my last name letters and could signify – “what goes around – comes around.” Maybe it is an endless cycle of karma or in a higher realm dharma.

This is the second installment:

It’s the attack of the “B”s with an E. (three B or not to Be, that is the question, right? Right?)

OMG.

Run…

 

Bloviate – sounds like a dirty word from the 50s. from the Online Etymology Dictionary (see link below) – 1857, American English, a Midwestern word for “to talk aimlessly and boastingly; to indulge in ‘high falutin’,” according to Farmer (1890), who seems to have been the only British lexicographer to notice it (see end note 2). He says it was based on blow … I’m reminded of the 1971 film “Johnny Got His Gun” penned and directed by Dalton Trumbo – a searing satirical anti-war film that devastates the soul. The scene is about 20 minutes before the end of a bloviating boss repeating the same line over and over:

Am-The-Boss
“I’m the Boss, this is Champagne” Rinse-Repeat

The modern definition from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary: “to speak verbosely and windily” (see end note 1).

This reminds me of… well you know.

Behemoth – meaning a huge monster (see end note 1). Originates from a folk etymology of Egyptian pehemau, literally “water-ox,” the name for the hippopotamus (see end note 2).  The Monster Trucks are often referred to as a behemoth. In short the modern definition “something of monstrous size or appearance.” The behemoth waddled through the rhetoric the sound of his own voice in the grotesque melodrama of his disastrous making.

Bailiwick – he put it in his bailiwick – sounds like a British bicycle with a wicker basket you can put useless items you’ll never need on a trip, like a protractor without a map. Seriously though – used in a sentence: “He shrunk his bailiwick so as not to disturb any of the nefarious projects he had going on the sly.” Bailiwick falls under the domain of a bailiff or is superior knowledge or authority within a domain (see end note 1). With a narrower bailiwick he could use the favors (also known as emoluments) from foreign governments as assets in his war chest. from the Online Etymology Dictionary Figurative sense of “one’s natural or proper sphere” recorded by 1843.” (see end note 2).

 Expunge – used in a sentence: He expunged the official record without setting off the smoke detectors in a toilet bowl with a plunger. However, many people (especially of my ilk) would like to see him expunged from all history. Expunge to strike out, obliterate, mark for deletion or eliminate (see end note 1). And this gets better from the Online Etymology Dictionary (see end note 2)– I couldn’t have made this up for a more perfect fit: taken by early lexicographers in English to “denote actual obliteration by pricking

 

All of the words used in a sentence:

The bloviating pink-skinned, orange-haired behemoth stood in the center of his self-aggrandizing bailiwick and was expunged by a mob of a million French Fries from the Deep-State Grill behind bars.

 

 

End Notes:

  1. https://www.merriam-webster.com/
  2. https://www.etymonline.com/

 

Catch #1 of 1.0 An O Social Commentary Dictionary

 

 

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