Why I Used To Hate Cellphones

smartphone

Correcting technology for use instead of being a tool of technology and how I turned handicap into advantage.

 

I have a dumb phone. Though I have been strongly encouraged to get a smart phone and I say no.

to test this out I got an iPod touch

Texting on a dumb phone began to become tedious, difficult and then impossible. The buttons were too small, my fingers hurt from stabbing buttons and I would invariably miss a letter that spell check couldn’t correct. Why? The combination of the small buttons close together and arthritic fingers twisted around on key texting fingers.

I considered getting an iPhone in the 00s. So to test this out I got an iPod touch – an iPhone without the phone part. This was fruitless as well. The portrait buttons were too small and I missed multiple times and the landscape buttons same.

I began to resent my dumb phone from ringing when I was in the middle of a conversation with someone in the same room as me.

I was saved from iPhone and smartphone addiction by a cruel twist of fate – to quote Bob Dylan and that was a silver lining.

Eventually I turned the vibration thingy off.

Then I began to resent my dumb phone from ringing when I was in the middle of a conversation with someone in the same room as me. So I switched it to vibrate. Most of the time others couldn’t hear it unless I was alone with one other person or the room was quiet and I was leading a meditation.

I’m practicing being present without tech to distract me.

Eventually I turned the vibration thingy off. I explained to friends, clients and associates that they could call my landline or my cell and leave a voice mail. I told them that the best way to reach me by phone in-person was my landline. That they could only leave a message on my cell and that I used my cell to make brief out going calls – only. And I use it for the alarm x2 to 3 per day.

I also tell friends, associates and clients that they can text me. Oh yes, oh yes, oh yes I can sent and receive texts on my iPad Pro 9.75” – due to the bigger keys, less likely to hit the wrong key. The difference between an iPad and a cell phone is its bigger (duh) and I don’t take it out and use it unless I choose. I’m not used by it as much as I would if I had my cell phone ringer on.

Believe me I am distracted enough by my own errant thoughts than to add tech to the mix.

Now when I’m with someone a cell phone or my iPad does not interrupt me either. I’m practicing being present without tech to distract me. Believe me I am distracted enough by my own errant thoughts than to add tech to the mix.