Memory, Time and Identity

“The distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”  Einstein

ArcOtimeX

Linear time is the kind of time we know and we are often unaware of it and rarely question its veracity due to its invisibility.

Memory is the foundation of identity, time, space, intent, purpose, meaning and perhaps destiny. Without memory humans as we know the species could not exist.

Sense Organs and Memory

Senses

Memory, both long and short term, appears to be stored and processed in the human neo-cortex. It is created through a variety of perceptual filters through a variety of senses that are organ-based for external stimuli:

  1. Visual
  2. Auditory
  3. Tactile
  4. Olfactory
  5. Gustatory (taste)
  6. Itch
  7. Pressure
  8. Temperature
  9. Hunger
  10. Thirst
  11. Pain
  12. Direction
  13. Muscle Tension
  14. Proprioception -the ability to tell where your body parts are, relative to other body parts
  15. Equilibrioception – spatial orientation, balance, body movement, acceleration and decceralation, directional changes
  16. Stretch Receptors – these are found in such places as the lungs, bladder, stomach, blood vessels, and the gastrointestinal tract.)
  17. Chemoreceptors – these triggers areas of the medulla in the brain that is involved in detecting blood born hormones and drugs. It also is involved in the vomiting reflex.
  18. Sexual stimulation

Non-organ sensations cannot be separated from memory and they include but may not be limited to:

  • Attention – may be the only sense involves the shifting or changing focus to internal or external stimuli in present time and involves memory as an adjunct
  • Time / Memory- time* cannot exist without memory and memory cannot exist without time
  • Agency – meaning a subjective feeling of having chosen an action
  • Familiarity – recognition (grounded in long and short term memory cues)

All the sense organs / filters listed above interact with memory and help form a sensation of the passage of time and cement individual and species identity. Memory is processed through and interacts with a number of perceptual filters that we as humans create our environment (see figure 1 below):

personMemory

Senses, Memory and Attention

Individual memories exist and are malleable. Memory is selective depending on how we cultivate focused and diffused attention within conscious memory. Our brains hold more information than the conscious memories that we can recall. That information could consist of our unconscious memories. It is possible to access unconscious memories in the present through a variety of techniques (practiced divided attention, trance-work, hypnotherapy to name a few).

Language, ego, learning, familial prejudices and biases, beliefs and emotional states are some of the factors that are screeners for the focus of attention. The amount of information that impinges on all our sense organs and their combinations are much more than we remember consciously. This unregistered data may represent some of the information that comes through to us in dreams and /or it could be useful in long term memory retrieval and reconstruction and / or it could represented shared memory consciousness, “past, future or parallel lives”. Until we access the unconscious materials we may never know what the specifics of unregistered data, how it is stored, where it is stored and how it can be retrieved.

All of us know how to focus our attention because we have been inculcated with this method of “paying attention” since we entered elementary school. Most American public education systems have been organized along a Prussian military system of rows and columns dictated for order with attention drawn exclusively to the teacher. This way of directing attention besides being an active method is built on a hierarchical system that implies strata or a class system.

Active attention is a subject focusing on an object as directed by a intermediary mainly a teacher. Television, Cinema, and some computer applications are examples of active attention systems. Networks of roads and automobile travel also follows the active attention system.

Receptive attention is invisible mostly because the habituation of active / focused attention. Receptive attention could be relegated to daydreaming and is mostly discarded as a learning strategy. Receptive attention involves subtly shifting focus from one point to an aggregate field. This kind of focus is one of dividing attention by shifting from different foci. For example look at the dot at the center of figure 3.

 

AttentionExercise

Blur your focus. Then use your peripheral vision to attend to the field. This can be done in your house as well: 1. Stare a point on the wall opposite of where you are sitting; 2. While continuing to stare at the dot pay attention to the surround “aggregate” field with your attention taking note of what you glean in your visual field. Exercises like this one are designed to stretch or lengthen attention span while allowing the receptive information that your senses are registering to be acknowledged and cataloged to some degree.

Attention is the building block of consciousness. Memory recall allows attention to expand based on previous experiences. The main danger and/or benefit of operating from memory are assumptions. The danger of some assumptions based on memories of previous experiences could be premises that are faulty for a variety of reasons. The benefit of making assumptions based on memories are streaming lining habits that become part of autonomic processing. Driving a car is an example. Once we learn the processes of driving they become habit and go into autonomic processing flow.

Repetitive acts become habits seamlessly so our conscious minds can pay attention to other stimuli in our immediate environments.

 

Space-Time and Memory

Linear time is the kind of time we know. We know this kind of time so well we don’t call it linear. We don’t see it as illusion or a system we invented unless we have been alerted that it exists in this way. Linear time is invisible and seamless. We continually make assumptions about “the past” as if it is a place that exists – in the past because we remember it. We remember past events that have been ordered by language and linear-spatial time because our parents and the current epoch of civilization have taught us to structure reality in this way. We learned aural language to communicate with our parents and define ourselves – “this is me and this is not me” etc. The structure of language follows a pattern of past, present and future.

Most of our identity is recorded in our memory. The past exists in the present accessible through memories. Assumptions about “the future” are extrapolations based on past assumptions of commonly observable events currently stored in memory.

Families, friends, groups, communities, states, nations and historians holding a particular point of view agree upon shared memories of recorded histories. These consensual memories are sometimes built on entrenched philosophical stances and highly charged emotional states. Conservative Republicans have different interpretations of facts presented by historians than Left leaning Liberal Democrats. Sometimes facts are disputed and sometimes not but the course of action differs based on belief etc.

Memories record the passage of time and provide the illusion that the past exists in a place. The reason for this is memories recreate the passage of time in a full sensory 3-D memory replete with emotional content etc. Past memories are not the literal past. Memories are merely a record of past events.

It’s easier to see that the future doesn’t exist because we have no memory of it. We anticipate future events base on past memories, extrapolations, assumptions and expectations etc.

The fleeting present that disappears into short term memory can barely be grasped if at all. Memory, associative thought and emotion are the factors that help create identity.

 

Collective / Shared Memory

Our human species while having features in our brains and bodies for memory storage there may be a shared weak EM (electromagnetic) field that may hold memories in common. However there is mutual agreement for collective memory as recorded in history books and writings made by individuals in history itself. Individual memories interact with others to form a collective memory system (see figure 2 below):

MemoryNet

 

Memory is both individual and shared. A human cannot thrive alone completely. Infants need parents for care and learning – creating the basis for shared and eventually collective memories. This not only defines individual identity but it also ensures the survival of the species.

Strong recognition appears to be based on emotional bonds that are reinforced by memory recall as well as many accompanying perceptual filters (organs). I recognize my mother’s face and she recognizes mine. There is an emotional bond that sparks memory with the bond of love. This is one example of how we create an individual in an interdependent social world.

In NDE (Near Death Experiences) people sometimes report passing through a tunnel of light and meeting relatives that have passed on. Are these memories of “dead” relatives or are these actual relatives?

When my father passed to the next life I watched different vibrational fields create the tunnel of light that his consciousness passed through. He “met” his dead relatives and conjured them up as he remembered them. They in-turn used these conjurings to interface in a recognizable medium for the purpose of communication. (Could this also be happening as we meet friends and relatives still living?)

Many quantum physicists are admitting that reality is created by us and projected “out there” to be experienced. If we as a species are creating reality based on the 18 senses listed below:

  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Tactile
  • Olfactory
  • Gustatory (taste)
  • Itch
  • Pressure
  • Temperature
  • Hunger
  • Thirst
  • Pain
  • Direction
  • Muscle Tension
  • Proprioception -the ability to tell where your body parts are, relative to other body parts
  • Equilibrioception – spatial orientation, balance, body movement, acceleration and decceralation, directional changes
  • Stretch Receptors – these are found in such places as the lungs, bladder, stomach, blood vessels, and the gastrointestinal tract.)
  • Chemoreceptors – these triggers areas of the medulla in the brain that is involved in detecting blood born hormones and drugs. It also is involved in the vomiting reflex.
  • Sexual stimulation

And 4 non-organ sensations cannot be separated from memory (or 22 senses in all) and they include but may not be limited to:

  • Attention – may be the only sense involves the shifting or changing focus to internal or external stimuli in present time and involves memory as an adjunct
  • Time / Memory – time* cannot exist without memory and memory cannot exist without time
  • Agency – meaning a subjective feeling of having chosen an action
  • Familiarity – recognition (grounded in long and short term memory cues)

 

All 22 senses listed above rely on memory to function. If memory did not exist we would not know about them. Time and Memory are so inexorably bound and belong together as a sense and involve all other senses.

All the senses listed above including time/memory work in concert with others of our human species. It would seem that memory and the “passage of time” that composes the identity of individuals is necessary for the survival of the species. It follows that our species might also interact with other collective memories of species such as mammals, animals, vegetation, bacteria and viruses.

There are two types of time-space-memory modalities one is explicit and the other implicit. The explicit or more obvious time/space/memory modality is oral and written history, archeology – most written and is based on consensual historical agreements of past memories. There are histories of the Holocaust as perpetrated by Hitler and the Nazis is a matter of eye-witness accounts. There are oral histories – both in person and through media as films and television documentaries and written histories in books. However its safe to report that there is no one still alive to give an oral report of the American Revolutionary War. Our collective memories arise from written histories after the fact and documents written during the time of the war. An implicit modality is only a theory that there is a collective time/space collective memory net in a low frequency EM field.

The discovery of magnetite produced in the human brain that assists in generating a low level EM (Electromagnetic) field that coordinates with the electromagnetic energy of Earth and with geomagnetic storms. Since memory is stored as electric impulses in the brain it can be extrapolated that the low EM field could relate to an exo-corporeal field that the members of the human species create in a group memory net.

Memories accessed from the group memory net (GMN) could be a form time travel via consciousness transfer alone. Authors writing similar themes in distant locations could have easily accessed the GMN. The GMN could define the human species as a whole via access and group subsets within that whole that may supersede the connectivity of the Internet.

 

NOTES:

*Time – time may be experienced in a wider consciousness and lose memory as we know it. This is nearly impossible to explain because it supersedes ordinary human experience

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/coming-to-grips-with-the-implications-of-quantum-mechanics/

 

https://www.gaia.com/video/brain-crystals-and-psychic-powers?fullplayer=feature

 

Triggers – a personal story

corona

I’m no expert. I have lived with triggers all my life but didn’t know they were triggers until I was in my late 30s.

It was a body memory evoking trigger [that lasted] ten years

What is a trigger in terms of a psychological phenomena? Wikipedia describes:

trauma trigger is the subjective attribution that a psychologic stimulus caused someone to recall the memory of a previous psychological trauma, although the stimulus itself need not be frightening or traumatic and can be indirectly or superficially reminiscent of an earlier traumatic incident. Trauma triggers are related to posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD), a condition in which people often cannot control the recurrence of emotional or physical symptoms,[1] or of repressed memory.[2][3][4] Triggers can be subtle and difficult to anticipate,[1][5] and can sometimes exacerbate PTSD. A trauma trigger may also be referred to as a trauma stimulus or a trauma stressor.[6]

Remembering times in my past where I had been mildly dissociated. I surmised that I may have been triggered and didn’t know it. Then there were the blackouts with substances and then without substances where triggers were most definitely involved, but impossible to identify.

I told myself that my body felt safe

One of the first pervasive triggers that I experienced lasted during all my waking hours for ten years. It was was a body memory that evoked triggers but in the beginning had no emotion attached to it and then there were fleeting feelings of sadness, grief and moments of profound depression. After those feelings passed the one that remained was rage. It was always there in the background.

The body memory was related to sexual trauma and PTSD symptoms. The specific body memory was a sensation in my jaw that someone was trying to open my mouth and I was resisting with all my might.

One of the difficulties with triggers are identifying that I have been triggered.

I told myself that my body felt safe enough to remember the trigger. Each time I noticed the body memory trigger its physical sensations and accompanying emotions I told myself that my body was releasing the memories.

One day after ten years I woke up and thought: “Something is different.” When I first acknowledged that the body memory had ceased it came back immediately. Within a few days it disappeared. It returns occasionally but is no longer a fixture in my life.

One of the difficulties with triggers are identifying that I have been triggered. Sometimes it has taken me days to realize I have been triggered especially if I feel angry or rageful with a seemingly rational reason.

The nature of being triggered flips me into being isolated because perpetrators isolated me to abuse me.

There have only been three times where I have been able to identify the source of the trigger. One was the body memory of sexual abuse, already mentioned above. I was with a client in his home. He pursed his lips a certain way and I had a visceral response of wanting to punch him and beat him up. I had to bite my tongue to calm down and restraint myself from beating him up. Why the trigger occurred was not in doubt, what it was – was uncertain.

In October of 1995 when I was driving back from having had therapy in Pt. Reyes Station I was driving under a plume of smoke from the Mt Vision fires that destroyed over 40,000 acres. The smoke made the sun red as it set. When I returned home I was inconsolably in tears. I called my therapist – why was I so upset? I had asked. “The fire is big and out-of-control just as your perpetrators were when you were young.” She suggested I use a coping tool to calm down and manage the trigger. I did.

The problems with most triggers are:

  • An environmental cue activates trauma from our past.
  • Once triggered we often enter a regressed or frozen state when we had been traumatized – and may not realize we have been triggered (a call for help to a support person or persons may be useful).
  • We may act out as a result of having been triggered. (This can be mild to major and perhaps life-threatening).
  • We may appear non-rational to others where they may shun us or they may also get triggered.
  • The desire to identify and control future triggers may consume us. Realizing this is an impossible venture is a good first step to work on defusing and working with future triggers.

The nature of being triggered flips me into being isolated because perpetrators isolated me to abuse me. So when I get triggered, especially when I don’t realize I am triggered I isolate. It was a strategy I used as a child to survive. It may or may not have worked very well but when I am triggered and don’t know I am triggered it remains my “go-to” strategy.

Thinking about what “just happened” and analyzing it with the thought that “If I can figure it out I can – know what happened to me; – I can prevent it from happening again.

Thinking was what I used as a child from inside the trauma to survive is a habit. But it doesn’t necessarily work very well to solve the emotional trigger of the trauma. Its one of the ways I perpetuate remaining isolated and lost in a regressive or frozen state of trauma from the past.

Its good to have a preemptive plan to deal with triggers in advance so we can get the help we need until we reach a place where we can deal with triggers more effectively.

This is where a therapist can assist or a self-help guide.

I have found that when I know that I’m triggered that I tell myself I am ready to handle it because I’m aware that I’ve been triggered. However if I’m triggered but am not yet aware of it, I know that I feel stuck, agitated, and/or distressed emotionally I try one of the following options:

  • I reach out for support
  • I ask for feedback
  • I ask for help
  • I sit with my feelings and try to identify what they are before taking any action.

This is just a sample and in no way is what I recommend.

What I do recommend is for you to come up with your own safety plan for dealing with emotional upsets, stuck places and triggers.

[NOTE: I was triggered by my partner when we were hiking Mount Tamalpais (in Marin County California). I told her. She wanted to take responsibility by wanting to know what she had done to trigger me. I told her I didn’t know and that it wasn’t her fault. I told her that I just wanted her to know in case she felt me pulling away from her during my process of the trigger and using my safety measures. I’m not sure she understood and decided not to tell her again if I had been triggered due to her response.

Often in dysfunctional relationships we put responsibility on others for our emotions. This is a reaction that does not make another responsible for our response. We have feelings. In relationships – couple therapy is a good idea to help resolve interpersonal communications and dysfunctional dynamics. Individual therapy can be useful too.

When a trigger brings up a feeling in one person and that one person blames another for their trigger – this is an incorrect understanding of a trigger. Conversely of a non-triggered person enters into an interaction with a triggered partner for example especially if the triggered person is unaware they have been triggered then a mess ensues. If the triggered person becomes aware they have been triggered and the non-triggered partner attempts to intervene – to fix the situation then what occurs still could result in a mess.

One possible way to prevent a trigger from creating a mess would to speak with your partner about your triggers. Explain to them they are in no way responsible for the emotional reactions they – the triggered person, may have and that they may need:

  • space
  • try to be patient – wait
  • for the non-triggered person not to make assumptions
  • know they are in no way responsible for having been triggered.

Enneagram as Process – a primer

EnnegramKitchenAtWork

Many of you who are readers – the above diagram have come to know the enneagram (nine-picture) as a tool for nine personality types. The lesser-known function of the enneagram is a system for processing complex operations. The enneagram operates on the Mystery Numbers as uncovered by Nikola Tesla as the 3, 6, 9 sequence.

Nine is a number of completion and represents the sum of all the parts of the process and a mystical element as represented by the gap between numbers 4 and 5.

Nine is also an invisible force

Three represents the law of three a building block of the universe and in this case #3 is a positive urge or active principle, #6 is a negating urge or receptive principle and #9 is a neutral urge / position or a reconciling principle. The law of three supports all actions and yet is separate from linear actions.

Six operated on two plains of existence: a progression from 1 to 4 followed by a shock that activates 5 through 8 in an exterior cause and effect relationship and the inner lines are the connecting / uniting principles that are not so easily recognized.

  1. 1 to 4
  2. 4 to 2
  3. 2 to 8
  4. 8 to 5
  5. 5 to 7
  6. 7 to 1

The inner lines can also flow in reverse supporting the internal structure of the process.

Nine is also an invisible force and is often overlooked in everyday life. Neutrality technical speaking is not an urge or a force per-se. A neutron as part of an atom holds no charge, where as electrons are negatively charged and protons are positively charged. When we exclude 9 from the equation we have an octave since it is both neutral and the combination of all the parts into the unity of the entire process.

1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 – 7 – 8EnnegramKitchenAtWorkNine represents the unity of the entire process of The Kitchen at Work preparing, serving and eating the meal. It is the neutral point where all is happening and nothing is happening simultaneously. Three are the Raw Materials of the meal being prepared such as vegetables, meat, dairy products, eggs, cooking oils, spices and so on. Six are the recipients of the cook meal whether it be the community, family or the chef.

the Mystery Numbers as uncovered by Nikola Tesla as the 3, 6, 9 sequence

The independence of the triangle (triad) 9 – 3 – 6 can exist without the process of >>>1 – 2 – 4 – 5 – 7 – 8 in a place of expectation or energy potential. The six other points of 1 – 2 – 4 – 5 – 7 – 8 cannot exist without the triad. Potential energy fueled through our will yields a process that is a working kitchen for the preparation, cooking, serving and eating of meals.

[NOTE – the next piece will utilize the enneagram as a way to look at the processes of time]


For further reading about the enneagram as a system for process see:

The Intelligent Enneagram by A.G. E. Blake

https://www.amazon.com/Intelligent-Enneagram-G-Blake/dp/1570622132

Effective Manifestation – an example – bringing in a life partner

loveflameEternity-copy2

– Making Full Use of Affirmations

The chief problem with affirmation effectiveness comes from both an illusory notion that our minds are all-powerful and a disconnection from other parts of our selves.

 We forget that we have emotions and an emotional center.

We forget we have a physical body.

 Okay, we don’t really forget these parts of ourselves we assume that these two other centers in us are part of that affirmation without acknowledging their true importance. As a result of this assumption we draw our emotions and our physical presence from an automatic or mechanic place so that the power of these centers may be greatly reduced.

In a workshops I have given on Mastery, we work with affirmations from a Full-Bodied Manifestation perspective can lead to greater results. I invite you experiment with contacting the center of emotions, your heart and the center of the physical body or moving center – the second chakra and incorporating the energies from these centers in your affirmations.

Get a special notebook that you will use for your affirmations and a pen that you will only use to write your affirmations. Write a vision statement/description of your involvement / relationship with that which you want to manifest – such as your beloved. Look at your vision statement before you write you affirmations.

Write in the morning when you wake and/or at night before going to sleep. Here is an affirmation for bringing in a lover or life-partner:

I, your First and Last name, am in a loving relationship with (the man, woman or being) of my visions and/or profile.

I, First and Last Name, deserve to be in this relationship.

I, First and Last Name, am creating opportunities for us to meet.

_______

You, First and Last name, are in a loving relationship with (the man or woman) of your visions and/or profile.

You, First and Last Name, deserve to be in this relationship.

You, First and Last Name, are creating opportunities for the two of you to meet.

_______

She or He, First and Last name, are in a loving relationship with (the man or woman) of his/her visions and/or profile.

She or He, First and Last Name, deserve to be in this relationship.

She or He, First and Last Name, are creating opportunities for the two of them to meet.